The Homing Pigeons by Sid Bahri

WWW Wednesday (10/07/2013) – Vol. 4

www_wednesdays43

 (click on the pic above to reach MizB)

Hello everyone! This weekly book meme is hosted by MizB of Should be Reading. To play along, we just have to answer the following three (3) questions… • What are you currently reading? • What did you recently finish reading? • What do you think you’ll read next?

I am currently reading “The Palace of Illusions” by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni I was gifted this book by a friend on my birthday last month. I fell in love with cover of the book. It has glitters on the cover page giving it a maharaja-time feel. I have started the book recently, & I like what I have read so far. The epic Mahabharata told from the view point of a woman, Panchali, looks fascinating to me. The cover & blurb of the book is given below:

1774836

A re-imagining of the world-famous Indian epic, the Mahabharat—told from the point of view of an amazing woman. Relevant to today’s war-torn world, The Palace of Illusions takes us back to a time that is half history, half myth, and wholly magical. Narrated by Panchaali, the wife of the legendary Pandavas brothers in the Mahabharat, the novel gives us a new interpretation of this ancient tale.  The novel traces the princess Panchaali’s life, beginning with her birth in fire and following her spirited balancing act as a woman with five husbands who have been cheated out of their father’s kingdom. Panchaali is swept into their quest to reclaim their birthright, remaining at their side through years of exile and a terrible civil war involving all the important kings of India. Meanwhile, we never lose sight of her strategic duels with her mother-in-law, her complicated friendship with the enigmatic Krishna, or her secret attraction to the mysterious man who is her husbands’ most dangerous enemy. Panchaali is a fiery female redefining for us a world of warriors, gods, and the ever-manipulating hands of fate.

I recently finished reading “The Homing Pigeons” by Sid Bahri. In this book, the author uses the voices of the 2 protagonists to tell the story, giving us two perspective of the same story. The version of both the genders, with their individual psychology, makes them believable. The end of the story was evident but the journey which Sid Bahri takes us through the lives of Aditya & Radhika amidst the various emotions was worth taking. I recommend this book to all those who believe & have faith in love. The detail review here.

The Homing Pigeons Cover ok

Regarding the book I will read next, I have two more books that I received as my birthday presents – The Legend of Amrapali by Anurag Anand & Message in a Bottle by Nicholas Spark. Also I have heard good reviews about two new books which I plan to buy next monthThe House with a Thousand Stories by Aruni Kashyap (plot based on my home state, Assam) & Teatime for the Firefly by Shona Patel. So time will tell which one I feel picking up for my next read. 🙂

newWWW

WWW Wednesday is a great way to discover new books. So friends, feel free to leave your links to your WWW Wednesday posts or your comments (if you don’t have a blog), so that I can check out what you’re reading. Till then, happy reading! 🙂

Images: Goodreads

The Homing Pigeons – A Review

The Homing Pigeons Cover ok

(Click to reach the Goodreads page)

Of late, I have been reading Indian authors back to back. And I am wowed, almost by each one of them. The stories they tell are seldom complex but the story telling is what catches my attention. One of my recent read is The Homing Pigeons. Many a times, I pick up books fascinated by its cover. This is one such book and I must say, I judged this book correctly by its cover. This is the debut novel of Sid Bahri. The title and the cover page is what caught my attention at first. And of course, the many book bloggers talking about the book. Most of them had one thing in common to say about the book – it’s a love story, completely different but very relatable. In the words of the author, after all, ‘not all love stories are perfect, but then, neither are people’.

The story leaves you hooked until the end, for it makes you experience love in the most emotional and unconventional way. It tells you that love exists & survives, and not just in “happy ever after” situations but in adversities as well. It tells  the story of such a love which though born was never meant to survive, and though survived was never meant to prosper. But prosper it did, even after years and years of hardships and misfortunes.

This story is of Aditya and RadhikaAditya is a jobless man who lives with his wife in a loveless marriage & in ‘her’ house. After he could not find a job even after 2 years of his restructuring, in order to pay his bills, he finds himself become a gigolo. Radhika is a 32 year old widow who married a man almost twice her age & who has left her a fortune. With each flashback the readers get a glimpse into their real world, their insecurities, their regrets and vulnerabilities. At the beginning it seems that there are 2 parallel stories running but soon it becomes evident that the two are related.

Aditya and Radhika are not the picture perfect couple. They have flaws in their characters and are seen to succumb to situations instead of fighting them. But just like homing pigeons, who come back to their mate, wherever you leave them, both Radhika & Aditya finally find themselves together after battling all hardships of life. On their way forward they learned as well as unlearned lessons of life…… just like any other human being. Destiny plays a strong part in the story.

The myriad of emotions in the story – undying love, guilt, shame, anger, longing & desire……all are portrayed in the characters of Aditya & Radhika, without being apologetic about it. I could relate to many situations and also to the characters, especially Radhika. We women tend to give in many times; we are ready to sacrifice, for the ones we love.  However we seldom think, of its consequences & if that sacrifice is worth doing.

In this book, the author uses the voices of the 2 protagonists to tell the story, giving us two perspective of the same story. The version of both the genders, with their individual psychology, makes them believable. The end of the story was evident but the journey which Sid Bahri takes us through the lives of Aditya & Radhika amidst the various emotions was worth taking. I recommend this book to all those who believe & have faith in love.

Quotes from the book I liked:

We work, in the hope that we will get a raise. We love, in the hope that we will find a soul mate. And we earn, in the hope that we will never have to work again ~ Aditya

It was ironic that she had said what she had. I was immature enough to be in love and yet, mature enough to be married ~ Radhika


WWW Wednesdays Vol. 2 (12/06/2013)

www_wednesdays43

(WWW Wednesday is hosted by MizB; you can click on the pic above to reach her blog)

So finally I am writing my 2nd WWW Wednesday post (here is my 1st post) I am not a very fast reader, so it is not possible for me to post every week. Nevertheless, I shall do it every time I am ready. 🙂

Taking a cue from Ashima from http://limenlemony.wordpress.com, I am including a little detail of the books in this post.

To play along, we just have to answer the following three (3) questions…

• What are you currently reading?
• What did you recently finish reading?
• What do you think you’ll read next?

Lately, I am into books written by upcoming Indian authors. And so far, I have not been disappointed much.

I am currently reading the “The Other Side of the Table” by Madhumita  Mukherjee.

otherside of table

The Goodreads description of the book says-

“Circa 1990.
A world drawn and woven with words.
A bond punctuated by absence and distance…
Two continents. Two cities. Two people.
And letters. Hundreds of them.
Over years. Across oceans. Between hearts.
Between Abhi, who is training to be a neurosurgeon in London, and Uma, who is just stepping into the world of medicine in Kolkata.
As they ink their emotions onto paper, their lives get chronicled in this subtly nuanced conversation through letters … letters about dreams, desires, heartbreaks, and longings… about a proverbial good life falling apart, about a failed marriage, a visceral loss, and about a dream that threatens social expectations…
Letters that talk. And don’t. Letters about this and that. Letters about everything…
Letters with a story you would never expect. “

The very idea of a story of two persons written in the form of a series of letters intrigued me and so did some reviews in Goodreads. Also, I liked the cover of the book where the connection between the 2 protagonists in 2 cities has been depicted. Nice 🙂 And so I picked up this book. I have read only a few pages and so far I like it.

I recently finished reading “To Sir, With Love” by E.R. Braithwaite.

to sir

In my 1st WWW Wednesday post I had said I will read “Chanakya’s Chant” by Ashwin Sanghi. But instead of that, I read two different books – “Take One More Chance” by Shriya Garg (review here) & “To Sir, With Love” by E R Braithwaite (a detailed review coming up shortly).

For me, “To Sir, With Love” was both thought provoking & inspiring. The book talks about racism and also about how a teacher has great impact on the lives of his/her students.

What attracted me in this book was the  charcater of Mr Braithwaite. The way he conducted himself, inspite of people discriminating against him for the colour of his skin, and the way he brought in a change into the lives of his uncouth & unruly students (with his examples, morals & intelligence), was very inspiring.

New York Times had rightly said about the book, “A book that the reader devours quickly, ponders slowly, forgets not at all….. Moving and inspiring”.

Regarding the book I will read next, I am not quite sure. I have a set of new books. So which one I will pick amongst them, only time will tell. The books I have are:

  1. The Homing Pigeons by Sid Bahri (I have read a lot of positive reviews about this book)
  2. If It’s Not Forever. It’s Not Love by Durjoy Datta & Nikita Singh
  3. Chanakya’s Chant by Ashwin Sanghi

collage

I feel WWW Wednesday is a great way to discover new books. So friends, feel free to leave your links to your WWW Wednesday posts or your comments (if you don’t have a blog), so that I can check out what you’re reading.

Till then, keep reading! 🙂

Images: Google & Goodreads