humour

Band Baaja Boys – my thoughts

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Author – Rachna Singh

Blurb

Band, Baaja, Boys! is a sure-fire laugh riot that will make you giggle, chortle, chuckle and often burst into large guffaws.
BA-pass Brajesh sold bras in Manphodgunj. Perhaps his destiny was sealed the day Babuji named him Bra-jesh. Under normal circumstances, Brahmins were not supposed to be businessmen. But Kumud Bajpai had brought along a hosiery shop as dowry and there was no looking back. Only front!
One glance and Brajesh could estimate, ‘Madam, 38D will be perfect.’
Together, they had produced and raised Binny, their twenty-year-old daughter, who they lovingly called a ‘happy-go-lucky’ girl: happy to spend her father’s money while different fellows got lucky.
As was noted by most of Manphodgunj’s male population, Binny had come of age. Who, from the queue of suitors will bag her? Raja, who has lost his heart to her? Or, the ‘gorment‘- job-holder Tarun? Or, will it be the Sanskari-N.R.I., Harsh? Or, will Binny spurn all of them and elope with Rahul Pandey?
Band, Bajaa, Boys! will take you on the laugh-o-coaster of your life!

My thoughts – (more…)

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YES, MY ACCENT IS REAL – MY THOUGHTS

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Author – Kunal Nayyar

Blurb –

Of all the charming misfits on television, there’s no doubt Raj from The Big Bang Theory — the sincere yet incurably geeky Indian-American astrophysicist — ranks among the misfittingest. Now, we meet the actor who is every bit as loveable as the character he plays on TV. In this revealing collection of essays written in his irreverent, hilarious, and self-deprecating voice, Kunal Nayyar traces his journey from a little boy in New Delhi who mistakes an awkward first kiss for a sacred commitment, gets nosebleeds chugging Coca-Cola to impress other students, and excels in the sport of badminton, to the confident, successful actor on the set of TV’s most-watched sitcom since Friends.
Going behind the scenes of The Big Bang Theory and into his personal experiences, Kunal introduces readers to the people who helped him grow, such as his James Bond-loving, mustachioed father who taught him the most important lessons in life: Treat a beggar as you would a king. There are two sides to every story. A smile goes a long way. And, when in doubt, use a spreadsheet. Kunal also walks us through his college years in Portland, where he takes his first sips of alcohol and learns to let loose with his French, 6’8” gentle-giant roommate, works his first-ever job for the university’s housekeeping department cleaning toilets for minimum wage, and begins a series of romantic exploits that go just about as well as they would for Raj. (That is, until he meets and marries a former Miss India in an elaborate seven-day event that we get to experience in a chapter titled “My Big Fat Indian Wedding.”)
Full of heart, but never taking itself too seriously, this witty and often inspiring collection of underdog tales follows a young man as he traverses two continents in search of a dream, along the way transcending culture and language (and many, many embarrassing incidents) to somehow miraculously land the role of a lifetime.

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